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Modernist FraudHoax, Parody, Deception$
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Leonard Diepeveen

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198825432

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198825432.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 November 2020

Rereading the Shameless Puffery of Modern Charlatans

Rereading the Shameless Puffery of Modern Charlatans

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Rereading the Shameless Puffery of Modern Charlatans
Source:
Modernist Fraud
Author(s):

Leonard Diepeveen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198825432.003.0001

Beginning with the work of art critic Kenyon Cox and then turning to the many accusations of fraud levelled against modernism, Chapter 1 gives an account of fraud discourse’s dominance in early twentieth-century culture. Accusations of fraud were commonplace, and unleashed a set of rituals; fraud’s unveiling and fallout is highly stylized, and both narrative and social. These melodramatic moments of modern fraud, for all their lack of nuance, did a lot of work, and are part of a larger category that extends outward, taking on ideas such as insincerity, unclear intent, mimicry, and deception. After presenting a theory of fraud and its enabling conditions, the chapter argues that fraud discourse profoundly shaped the initial response to modernism, the modern canon, and its justifying principles.

Keywords:   fraud, hoax, moral panic, sincerity, Kenyon Cox, Henry Savage

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