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Tombs of the Ancient PoetsBetween Literary Reception and Material Culture$
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Nora Goldschmidt and Barbara Graziosi

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198826477

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198826477.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 December 2020

Impermanent Stones, Permanent Plants

Impermanent Stones, Permanent Plants

The Tombs of Poets as Material Objects in the Palatine Anthology

Chapter:
(p.217) 10 Impermanent Stones, Permanent Plants
Source:
Tombs of the Ancient Poets
Author(s):

Silvia Montiglio

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198826477.003.0011

This chapter identifies the ways in which epigrammatists in the Palatine Anthology create tombs that provide for a poet’s immortalization, not through everlasting stone, but through ever-growing plants. Vivifying plants creep over the tombs of Anacreon, Sophocles, and Machon, or the iambic poet Hipponax. Plants match poetry: the tomb of Hipponax, for example, is covered with stinging thorns and acerbic fruit. The lush vegetation which adorns the tombs of other poets in the Palatine Anthology echoes their privileged poetic connection with Dionysus, which—in a dialogue between text and tomb that is typical of the reception of tombs of the poets—often originates in their own works.

Keywords:   Anacreon, Sophocles, Machon, Hipponax, vegetation, Palatine Anthology, bees, honey, Dionysus

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