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Vices of the MindFrom the Intellectual to the Political$
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Quassim Cassam

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198826903

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198826903.001.0001

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Vice and Responsibility

Vice and Responsibility

Chapter:
(p.121) 6 Vice and Responsibility
Source:
Vices of the Mind
Author(s):

Quassim Cassam

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198826903.003.0006

This chapter explains and defends the distinction between blame and criticism and makes the case that epistemic vices can merit criticism even if they aren’t blameworthy. We are blameworthy for our epistemic vices only if they are epistemically harmful and we are, in the relevant sense, responsible for them. A distinction is drawn between responsibility for acquiring a vice (‘acquisition responsibility’) and responsibility for having a vice that one can change or revise (‘revision responsibility’). Revision responsibility requires the ability to control or modify the vice in question and there are three different varieties of control: voluntary, evaluative, and managerial. To the extent that we have effective control over our character vices that control is managerial rather than voluntary or evaluative.

Keywords:   blame, criticism, responsibility, acquisition responsibility, revision responsibility, voluntary control, evaluative control, managerial control

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