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Inequality After the TransitionPolitical Parties, Party Systems, and Social Policy in Southern and Postcommunist Europe$
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Ekrem Karakoç

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198826927

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198826927.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2020

Divergent Paths of Inequality in Poland and the Czech Republic

Divergent Paths of Inequality in Poland and the Czech Republic

Chapter:
(p.82) 4 Divergent Paths of Inequality in Poland and the Czech Republic
Source:
Inequality After the Transition
Author(s):

Ekrem Karakoç

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198826927.003.0004

Employing most similar design and process-tracing methodology, this chapter focuses on Poland and the Czech Republic in the postcommunist region. It discusses the divergent paths these two countries have taken since their transitions. After discussing the similarities and dissimilarities of these two cases, it turns to the welfare policies shared by both countries with some differences under their former communist rule. It also traces voter turnout and linkage between political party and citizens, and explores how these two factors have affected social policies in each country. The last section offers a comparison of Polish and Czech social policies regarding the level and nature of their targeted spending and its effect on income inequality.

Keywords:   inequality, social policy, parties, party systems, postcommunism, Poland, the Czech Republic, most similar design, process-tracing

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