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The Trial of the Kaiser$
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William A. Schabas

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198833857

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198833857.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 August 2021

Demand for Surrender

Demand for Surrender

Chapter:
(p.266) 17 Demand for Surrender
Source:
The Trial of the Kaiser
Author(s):

William A. Schabas

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198833857.003.0017

When the Treaty of Versailles entered into force in January 1920, the British, French, and Italians sent their demand for surrender to the Dutch Government. When it was promptly rejected, the three Allied Powers prepared a reply protesting the Dutch decision. But they were already shifting their position in favour of some form of internment similar to what had been imposed upon Napoleon in 1815. Initially, they sought internment far from Europe, but the Dutch were not interested. After a series of unpleasant diplomatic exchanges, the Dutch Queen issued a decree confining the Kaiser to his new castle in Doorn. The Kaiser remained at Doorn for the rest of his natural life, dying in 1941. By then, Germany had occupied the Netherlands and his castle was guarded by Wehrmacht troops. Hitler had his local hatchet-man, Arthur Seyss-Inquart, attend the funeral and present a wreath on his behalf.

Keywords:   internment, Napoleon, Doorn, Queen Wilhelmina, Arthur Seyss-Inquart

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