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Ocean RecoveryA sustainable future for global fisheries?$
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Ray Hilborn and Ulrike Hilborn

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198839767

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198839767.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 04 July 2022

The Forage Fish Rollercoaster

The Forage Fish Rollercoaster

Chapter:
(p.119) Chapter 11 The Forage Fish Rollercoaster
Source:
Ocean Recovery
Author(s):

Ray Hilborn

Ulrike Hilborn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198839767.003.0011

The Forage Fish Rollercoaster. Forage fish are the small fishes such as sardines, anchovy, mackerel, and herring that are among the most abundant fish in the sea and form the base of the fish food chain. They are often the dominant food for predatory fish, marine mammals, and marine birds. Forage fish are used both for direct human consumption and for the production of fishmeal and fish oil used as livestock and aquaculture feed. Many species of forage fish have shown vast cyclical variation in abundance long before industrial fishing began, and this complicates understanding how fishing affects their abundance. A recent concern is the effect that fishing of forage fish has on the abundance of their predators.

Keywords:   forage fish, small pelagic fishes, fishmeal, food chains, sardines

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