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Oxford Studies in Metaethics Volume 14$
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Russ Shafer-Landau

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198841449

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198841449.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 08 December 2021

The Fundamentality of Fit

The Fundamentality of Fit

Chapter:
(p.216) 10 The Fundamentality of Fit
Source:
Oxford Studies in Metaethics Volume 14
Author(s):

Christopher Howard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198841449.003.0010

Many authors, including Derek Parfit, T. M. Scanlon, and Mark Schroeder, favor a “reasons-first” ontology of normativity, which treats reasons as normatively fundamental. Others, most famously G. E. Moore, favor a “value-first” ontology, which treats value or goodness as normatively fundamental. Chapter 10 argues that both the reasons-first and value-first ontologies should be rejected because neither can account for all of the normative reasons that, intuitively, there are. It advances an ontology of normativity, originally suggested by Franz Brentano and A. C. Ewing, according to which fittingness is normatively fundamental. The normative relation of fittingness is the relation in which a response stands to an object when the object merits—or is worthy of—that response. The author argues that his “fittingness-first” ontology is no less parsimonious than either the reasons- or the value-first ontology, but it can plausibly accommodate the existence of all the normative reasons there are. It therefore provides a superior ontology of normativity.

Keywords:   metaethics, normativity, fitting-attitudes, reasons, value

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