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The International Rule of LawRise or Decline?$
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Heike Krieger, Georg Nolte, and Andreas Zimmermann

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780198843603

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198843603.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2020

Ensuring Access to Information: International Law’s Contribution to Global Justice

Ensuring Access to Information: International Law’s Contribution to Global Justice

Chapter:
(p.344) 22 Ensuring Access to Information: International Law’s Contribution to Global Justice
Source:
The International Rule of Law
Author(s):

Eyal Benvenisti

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198843603.003.0022

This chapter examines the role of international law in promoting indirectly global (and domestic) distributive justice. The focus on institutions and processes at the global level is grounded on the assumption that questions about the just allocation and reallocation of resources are ultimately resolved through processes of public deliberation (including through the involvement of courts). The author argues that the key to approaching a more just allocation of resources is by addressing the democratic deficits that underlie the skewed distribution (or the lack of redistribution) of assets and opportunities. He suggests that international law can play a role in the political empowerment of weak constituencies (within and between states). In doing so, international law can indirectly shape the distribution and redistribution of resources, in a manner that is more dignified and preferable to handing charitable contributions.

Keywords:   global justice, representation, international institutions, resources, redistribution

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