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Conservation PhysiologyApplications for Wildlife Conservation and Management$
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Christine L. Madliger, Craig E. Franklin, Oliver P. Love, and Steven J. Cooke

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198843610

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198843610.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 01 March 2021

Improving ‘shark park’ protections under threat from climate change using the conservation physiology toolbox

Improving ‘shark park’ protections under threat from climate change using the conservation physiology toolbox

Chapter:
(p.185) Chapter 11 Improving ‘shark park’ protections under threat from climate change using the conservation physiology toolbox
Source:
Conservation Physiology
Author(s):

Ian A. Bouyoucos

Jodie L. Rummer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198843610.003.0011

Sharks and rays are among the most threatened aquatic vertebrate taxa. This is due to a combination of their slow generation times, exploitation within the fisheries, and habitat degradation. Climate change was added as an additional, major threat to sharks and rays in the first decade of the 21st century. While marine protected areas are becoming more widespread, managing and conserving sharks and rays is complicated. Yet, the conservation physiology toolbox can be used to address such challenges. Here, we highlight studies from the Physioshark project, a conservation physiology research programme initiated to understand how human-induced stressors, primarily climate change, will affect tropical sharks and rays and the consequences for the health and viability of populations. We also highlight how other research teams from around the world have taken physiological approaches to understanding conservation problems for sharks. We then emphasize the importance of public outreach and education about the conservation issues sharks encounter, the benefits of using social media to disseminate key concepts, publications, presentations, media, and successes, and we underscore the power of storytelling through digital media as an important means for attracting attention to research, which can result in support and action.

Keywords:   elasmobranch, chondrichthyan, environmental stress, marine protected area, shark sanctuary, respirometry, bycatch, stress physiology, ocean acidification, ocean warming

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