Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
AI NarrativesA History of Imaginative Thinking about Intelligent Machines$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen Cave, Kanta Dihal, and Sarah Dillon

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198846666

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198846666.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 July 2021

Artificial Intelligence and the Sovereign-Governance Game

Artificial Intelligence and the Sovereign-Governance Game

Chapter:
(p.333) 14 Artificial Intelligence and the Sovereign-Governance Game
Source:
AI Narratives
Author(s):

Sarah Dillon

Michael Dillon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198846666.003.0015

Sarah Dillon and Michael Dillon bring political theory into dialogue with literary criticism in order to explore the interaction between artificial intelligence and the ancient conflict between sovereignty and governance, in which sovereignty issues the warrant to rule, and governance operationalizes it. They focus on three novels in which games, governance, and AI weave themselves through the text’s fabric: Iain M. Banks’s The Player of Games (1988) and Excession (1996), and Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice (2013). These novels play out the sovereign-governance game with artificial as well as human actors. In doing so, they question what might be politically novel about AI, but reveal that whilst AI impacts the pieces on the board, it does not materially change the logic of the game. These texts therefore raise questions, but do not provide answers, with regard to what might be required for AI technologies to change the algorithms of modern rule.

Keywords:   Artificial intelligence, sovereignty, governance, politics, games, rules, conflict, Banks, Leckie, Asimov

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .