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Energy Justice and Energy Law$
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Iñigo del Guayo, Lee Godden, Donald D. Zillman, Milton Fernando Montoya, and José Juan González

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198860754

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198860754.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 June 2021

Community Energy and a Just Energy Transition

Community Energy and a Just Energy Transition

What We Know and What We Still Need to Find Out

Chapter:
(p.67) 5 Community Energy and a Just Energy Transition
Source:
Energy Justice and Energy Law
Author(s):

Annalisa Savaresi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198860754.003.0005

In recent years, measures to stimulate local and rural communities’ involvement in the generation of renewable energy have been rather optimistically promoted as a means to engender greater legitimacy in and democratization of energy governance, tackle fuel poverty, and deliver energy justice. This chapter assesses what we really know about community energy and its suitability to deliver an equitable energy transition. It scrutinizes evidence from selected EU Member States that have pioneered the mainstreaming of community energy through the lens of justice theories, with the objective to gauge whether and how these policies address core justice questions associated with the energy transition, and the role of law in providing an answer to these. This chapter aims to probe the sometimes uncritical assumptions about community energy, highlighting the complex, layered, conflicting justice claims that underlie its mainstreaming. In order to do this, the chapter distils a set of distributive, procedural, and restorative justice questions associated with community energy, and considers the way in which they have been addressed, drawing on examples from Denmark, Germany, and the UK.

Keywords:   justice, community energy, renewable energy, energy transition, EU 2030 Climate and Energy Framework

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