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Agathokles of SyracuseSicilian Tyrant and Hellenistic King$
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Christopher de Lisle

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780198861720

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198861720.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 06 December 2021

Mainland Greece and the Diadochoi

Mainland Greece and the Diadochoi

Chapter:
(p.257) 9 Mainland Greece and the Diadochoi
Source:
Agathokles of Syracuse
Author(s):

Christopher de Lisle

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198861720.003.0010

This chapter deals with Agathokles’ relations with the cities of mainland Greece and the Macedonian warlords. Ties with mainland Greece were already deep at the start of Agathokles’ reign; relationships with Corinth and Sparta were of key importance during his original seizure of power. These ongoing relationships played a significant role in the construction of identity on both sides of the Adriatic. The Macedonian warlords loomed large in Sicily, partly because their activities seriously disrupted these relationships. Agathokles strove to keep them as far away from himself as possible while watching for opportunities to take advantage of their strife. The Diadochoi were quick to seize any ideology, resource, tactic, or alliance to gain the advantage over their foes. It is no surprise, therefore, that several strove to forge links with Agathokles, often employing the old links between Sicily and the poleis of Greece to do so.

Keywords:   Sparta, Corinth, Diadochoi, marriage alliance, Korkyra, Ophellas, Ptolemy I, Kassandros, Pyrrhos, Demetrios Poliorketes

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