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Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former YugoslaviaA Multidisciplinary Approach$
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Carsten Stahn, Carmel Agius, Serge Brammertz, and Colleen Rohan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198862956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198862956.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 October 2021

Symbolic Expression at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Symbolic Expression at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Chapter:
(p.149) 9 Symbolic Expression at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Source:
Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Author(s):

Marina Aksenova

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198862956.003.0010

The chapter argues that, at the creation of International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), conditions were ripe for establishing this kind of forum. The ICTY was instituted with one overarching aim: condemnation of evil deemed universal. The language of the UN Security Council resolutions demonstrates an intensifying concern over offences committed in the Balkan war. The overarching purpose of the tribunal was symbolic—to uphold the value of human dignity through the ritual of criminal prosecutions in the light of the inability of local actors to prevent further escalation of atrocities. The chapter relies on two theoretical frameworks to support its claim: the theory of discourse analysis developed by Michel Foucault, projecting the ICTY’s power outwards focusing on the content of its input, and an anthropological exploration of the symbolic nature of rituals by Maurice Bloch, identifying the structure within which this content is generated.

Keywords:   ICTY, language, symbolic purpose, theory of discourse, Michel Foucault, Maurice Bloch

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