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Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former YugoslaviaA Multidisciplinary Approach$
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Carsten Stahn, Carmel Agius, Serge Brammertz, and Colleen Rohan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198862956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198862956.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 October 2021

Lessons Learned from the Use of DNA Evidence in Srebrenica-related Trials at the ICTY

Lessons Learned from the Use of DNA Evidence in Srebrenica-related Trials at the ICTY

Chapter:
(p.209) 12 Lessons Learned from the Use of DNA Evidence in Srebrenica-related Trials at the ICTY
Source:
Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Author(s):

Kweku Vanderpuye

Christopher Mitchell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198862956.003.0013

This chapter discusses legal issues associated with the collection, storage, and use of DNA evidence in international and national criminal trials. It draws on experience at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in the Srebrenica cases. It shows how DNA evidence was used to identify the number of victims in a mass grave, and links and patterns between a victim and one or more crime sites. The chapter argues that the probative value and admissibility of DNA evidence is maximized when used in conjunction with other forensic sciences (e.g. archaeology, pathology, and anthropology). Also that reliance on all forensic sciences, not just DNA analysis, is the most likely way of establishing a complete picture of the victim’s identity; as well as the cause, manner, and circumstances of the victim’s death.

Keywords:   DNA analysis, evidence, forensic, admissibility, ICTY

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