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Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former YugoslaviaA Multidisciplinary Approach$
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Carsten Stahn, Carmel Agius, Serge Brammertz, and Colleen Rohan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198862956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198862956.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 May 2021

Whither Thou Truth and Justice

Whither Thou Truth and Justice

Witness Perceptions About their Contributions to the ICTY

Chapter:
(p.225) 13 Whither Thou Truth and Justice
Source:
Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Author(s):

Kimi Lynn King

James Meernik

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198862956.003.0014

Chapter 13 examines micro-level components shaping the witness experience. It develops a model of procedural justice to examine witness perceptions about the search for historical truth and justice. Based on extensive survey data from witnesses who testified before the International War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the study evaluates in depth the impact of testifying. The chapter uses logistic regression to evaluate whether certain testimonial challenges such as trial delays, language translation difficulties, and other stressors associated with the process of testifying contribute to perceptions about about witnesses’ contributions to truth and justice. Notably, we find ethnic and gender differences among the witnesses regarding whether they believed they have contributed to truth and justice by having testified, and the findings reveal limited support for the proposition that if witnesses feel they have been treated fairly they are more likely to believe they have contributed to justice.

Keywords:   witnesses, witness perceptions, witnesses’ contributions, truth and justice, reconciliation, historical truth

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