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Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former YugoslaviaA Multidisciplinary Approach$
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Carsten Stahn, Carmel Agius, Serge Brammertz, and Colleen Rohan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198862956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198862956.001.0001

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The (Lack of) Impact of the ICTY on the Public Memory of the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The (Lack of) Impact of the ICTY on the Public Memory of the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Chapter:
(p.559) 29 The (Lack of) Impact of the ICTY on the Public Memory of the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Source:
Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
Author(s):

Jovana Mihajlović Trbovc

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198862956.003.0030

This chapter tackles relations between facts established at the Tribunal and acknowledgement of these in the public domain of post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), where three ethnically defined and mutually contesting interpretations dominate the public forum. Examining how this problem unfolds, this chapter follows the development of the public memory about the war. It intersects with the relevant International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) jurisprudence, aiming to detect potential changes in the dominant narrative. It analyses public debates whether the war was a product of Serbian aggression or a civil war within Bosnia; whether ‘ethnic cleansing’ was pre-planned by the Serbian side or an inevitable consequence of the war (examined through the Prijedor case); whether genocide was the overall aim of the Serbian side or whether it took place only in Srebrenica; and whether the Croatian side was a defender of, or aggressor in BiH (examined through the Ahmići case).

Keywords:   narrative, ethnic cleansing, Srebrenica, public memory, interpretation, acknowledgement

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