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Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics Volume 10$
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Mark Timmons

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198867944

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198867944.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2021

A Kantian Solution to the Trolley Problem

A Kantian Solution to the Trolley Problem

Chapter:
(p.204) 9 A Kantian Solution to the Trolley Problem
Source:
Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics Volume 10
Author(s):

Pauline Kleingeld

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198867944.003.0010

This chapter proposes a solution to the Trolley Problem in terms of the Kantian prohibition on using a person ‘merely as a means.’ A solution of this type seems impossible due to the difficulties it is widely thought to encounter in the scenario known as the Loop case. The chapter offers a conception of ‘using merely as a means’ that explains the morally relevant difference between the classic Bystander and Footbridge cases. It then shows, contrary to the standard view, that a bystander who diverts the trolley in the Loop case need not be using someone ‘merely as a means’ in doing so. This makes it possible to show why the Loop scenario does not undermine the explanation of the salient moral difference between the Bystander and Footbridge cases.

Keywords:   Trolley Problem, Immanuel Kant, Kantian Ethics, Judith Jarvis Thomson, using merely as a means, practical reasoning, moral permissibility

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