Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics Volume 10$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mark Timmons

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780198867944

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2020

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198867944.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2021

After Aristotle’s Justice

After Aristotle’s Justice

Chapter:
(p.32) 2 After Aristotle’s Justice
Source:
Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics Volume 10
Author(s):

Mark LeBar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198867944.003.0003

To the extent that we are interested in justice as a virtue of character, we might start with Aristotle’s conception, but a fresh look at justice can, potentially, open avenues of thought in more than one direction. The fruits of interaction between Aristotelian and Kantian thought have been manifest in a wide variety of ways in recent years, and this chapter aspires to rethink the virtue of justice in this light. It aims to offer a first cut at a conception of a virtue of justice that draws on both traditions. Its Aristotelian provenance provides the general understanding of virtue employed, and accepts Aristotle’s general picture of virtue and its centrality to the good life and to happiness. The Kantian (and contractualist) part of the union provides content for justice as a distinctive virtue of character.

Keywords:   justice, virtue, character, Aristotle, Kant, eudaimonia, pleonexia, koinonia, authority, respect

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .