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Artificial Intelligence and Intellectual Property$
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Jyh-An Lee, Reto Hilty, and Kung-Chung Liu

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780198870944

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2021

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198870944.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 08 December 2021

Rethinking Software Protection

Rethinking Software Protection

Chapter:
(p.341) 15 Rethinking Software Protection
Source:
Artificial Intelligence and Intellectual Property
Author(s):

Peter R Slowinski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198870944.003.0016

The core of artificial intelligence (AI) applications is software of one sort or another. But while available data and computing power are important for the recent quantum leap in AI, there would not be any AI without computer programs or software. Therefore, the rise in importance of AI forces us to take—once again—a closer look at software protection through intellectual property (IP) rights, but it also offers us a chance to rethink this protection, and while perhaps not undoing the mistakes of the past, at least to adapt the protection so as not to increase the dysfunctionality that we have come to see in this area of law in recent decades. To be able to establish the best possible way to protect—or not to protect—the software in AI applications, this chapter starts with a short technical description of what AI is, with readers referred to other chapters in this book for a deeper analysis. It continues by identifying those parts of AI applications that constitute software to which legal software protection regimes may be applicable, before outlining those protection regimes, namely copyright and patents. The core part of the chapter analyses potential issues regarding software protection with respect to AI using specific examples from the fields of evolutionary algorithms and of machine learning. Finally, the chapter draws some conclusions regarding the future development of IP regimes with respect to AI.

Keywords:   artificial intelligence (AI), software protection, patents, copyright, machine learning, evolutionary algorithms

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