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God VisiblePatristic Christology Reconsidered$
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Brian E. Daley, SJ

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780199281336

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199281336.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 January 2022

Irenaeus and Origen

Irenaeus and Origen

A Christology of Manifestation

Chapter:
(p.65) 3 Irenaeus and Origen
Source:
God Visible
Author(s):

Brian E. Daley, SJ

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199281336.003.0003

Irenaeus wrote his two extant works chiefly to distinguish right faith from the various contemporary forms of “Gnostic” Christianity, which challenged the goodness and relevance of the material world, the body, and human institutions, promising instead secret, deeper knowledge of salvation in Christ that was available only to an elite. In response, Irenaeus affirmed the unity and constant providence of God in history, the narrative and doctrinal unity of the Hebrew Bible and the chief Christian documents, the personal unity of Christ as Son of God and son of Mary, and the worldwide unity of the church and its tradition of teaching. Origen of Alexandria also focused his efforts on correcting Gnostic understandings. The role of Christ, as God’s Word made flesh, is the heart of human redemption, revealing in his own biblical “titles” his identity as mediator between the unknowable Father and a straying humanity.

Keywords:   Irenaeus, Origen, Gnosis, Valentinians, recapitulation, providence, sacred history, material body, universal church, rule of faith

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