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Opera for the PeopleEnglish-Language Opera and Women Managers in Late 19th-Century America$
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Katherine Preston

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199371655

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780199371655.001.0001

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English-Language Opera in Postwar America

English-Language Opera in Postwar America

Chapter:
(p.14) 1 English-Language Opera in Postwar America
Source:
Opera for the People
Author(s):

Katherine K. Preston

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199371655.003.0002

This chapter is a summary of opera production in America from the end of the 1850s, through the Civil War, and into the halcyon postwar period. The beginning of the opera bouffe craze and the activities of light and grand opera companies are examined within the context of the successful foreign-language troupes during and after the war. American soprano Clara Louise Kellogg exemplifies a successful American prima donna who later became the manager of her own English-language company; during these years, however, she sang in Max Maretzek’s Italian-language ensemble. The operatic activity of this chapter is set against the background of a turbulent period of American social and cultural history; the narrative ends just prior to the Panic of 1873.

Keywords:   opera bouffe, Clara Louise Kellogg, Panic of 1873, light opera, grand opera, Civil War era

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